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The Blake Poetry Prize

Date: 31-Dec-2017

Capacity: Not Set Available


 Blake Poetry Prize
The Blake Poetry Prize challenges Australian poets to explore the spiritual and religious in a new work of 100 lines or less.
From 2017 Liverpool City Library, in partnership with Casula Powerhouse Arts Centre, will deliver The Blake Poetry Prize as a biennial event. Liverpool City Library and Casula Powerhouse Arts Centre will maintain the guiding principles of The Blake Poetry Prize in continuing to engage contemporary poets, both national and international, in conversations concerning faith, spirituality, religion, hope, humanity, social justice, belief and non-belief. The Blake Poetry Prize is an aesthetic means of exploring the wider experience of spirituality with the visionary imagining of contemporary poets.
The Blake Prize takes its name from William Blake, a poet and artist of undoubted genius, who integrated religious and artistic content in his work. The Blake Poetry Prize challenges contemporary poets of disparate styles to explore the spiritual and religious in a new work of 100 lines or less.
The Blake Poetry Prize is strictly non-sectarian. The entries are not restricted to works related to any faith or any artistic style, but all poems entered must have a recognisable religious or spiritual integrity.
To Apply: First, please pay your $20 entry fee. You will need the confirmation number when you fill out the entry form (download here). Poems and entry forms may be sent by email to blakepoetryprize@casulapowerhouse.com or hard copies may be submitted to: 
The Blake Poetry Prize
c/- Liverpool City Library
ATTN: Outreach Programs Coordinator
Locked Bag 7170
Liverpool BC NSW 1871
Please see entry form for all guidelines and conditions of entry.


SUBMISSION DEADLINE: 2 JUNE, 2017
Judges:

Maxine Beneba Clarke
Maxine Beneba Clarke is a widely published Australian writer of Afro-Caribbean descent and the author of the poetry collections Gil Scott Heron Is on Parole and Nothing Here Needs Fixing. Maxine’s short fiction, non-fiction and poetry have been published in numerous publications including Overland, The Age, Meanjin, The Saturday Paper and The Big Issue. Maxine’s memoir The Hate Race and her first children’s picture book The Patchwork Bike were published in 2016. Her collection Carrying the World won the 2017 Victorian Premier’s Literary Award prize for poetry.
Ali Cobby Eckermann
Ali Cobby Eckermann is the author of the poetry collections Little Bit Long Time and Inside My Mother and the memoir Too Afraid to Cry. Her verse novel, Ruby Moonlight, won the Kuril Dhagun Indigenous Writing Fellowship, the Kenneth Slessor Prize for Poetry and was awarded the Book of the Year at the NSW Premier’s Literary Awards in 2013. Ali was born on Kaurna Country, and grew up on Ngadjuri country South Australia and her mob is Yankunytjatjara from northwest South Australia. In 2017, Ali received one of the world’s richest literary awards, the Windham-Campbell Prize, administered by Yale University.
Mark Tredinnick
Mark Tredinnick, winner of the Montreal Poetry Prize (2011) and the Cardiff Poetry Prize (2012), is the author of The Blue Plateau, Fire Diary, and nine other acclaimed works of poetry and prose. Mark won the inaugural Blake Prize for Poetry in 2009. His work has also won the Queensland and WA Premier’s Literary Awards, and been shortlisted for the Prime Minister’s Literary Award. In 2016, Mark won the Australian Catholic University’s Poetry Prize for his poem The Horse. Two new collections of Mark’s poems will be published in 2017.


 

 

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